Shepherd and bestselling author James speaks about farming life in the Lake District fells, why historic farmed landscapes matter and are loved by people, and how they might survive in the future.

Using expert photographic reportage, over the last decade Nick has followed the lives of the same individuals and families in eight countries, across four continents, to show how they have been affected by the Millennium Development Goals.

Drawing on personal experiences, Niall describes the challenges and opportunities of biodiversity research where rapid development and illegal activities pose an immediate threat to the conservation of many endangered species.

Antonia tells the story of her solo exploration of Indochina’s legendary, yet fast-vanishing, Ho Chi Minh Trail, battling inhospitable terrain and multiple breakdowns on a motorcycle.

An account of the achievements and adventures, in the 1840s, of three self-educated, young British naturalists who became outstanding explorers of the Amazon, the world’s greatest river and ecosystem.

Caroline explores the presence and diverse experiences of black people in the multicultural city of London, from barmaids to servants, nurses and labourers, through asylum archives, family history and the press.

Cities in low-income countries are the most dynamic places on earth and will be for decades. What makes people move, how is this changing, and what do they do when they get there?

Bob Geldof takes the stage to speak about his extraordinary lifetime of humanitarian activities and adventure, from his work in Africa to training for his future travel into space.

As we become an urban species, how can our cities grow and become more resilient to climate change? Alex looks at the lessons London can learn, and apply, from international cities.

Researcher and television presenter Nick Barratt explores the 600 square miles of London’s suburbs, throwing new light on the forces that turned a scattering of villages into a global metropolis.

The Silk Road boasts some of the world’s most spectacular and legendary environments. Christopher Gardner will talk about its stunning flora, embracing areas such as Central Asia, Turkey and China.

Explorer Levison Wood will be speaking about his nine month expedition walking the length of the Nile through six countries; encountering civil war, close calls with crocodiles and much more.

Was Siberia just a frozen wasteland, a place of exile, prison and suffering? Janet investigates the settlers over four centuries of Russian expansion, throwing light on the lives of the people of this inhospitable land.

A Persian pursuit - Shirin Shabestari

Born in Iran, Shirin spent most of her childhood trekking with her father; however, her most life-changing journey was to go from being a full-time mum to leading an expedition to climb Iran’s highest peak, the 5,671m high Damavand. This was a journey intent on changing perceptions about modern day Iran, its people and its heritage.

Last year Rwandans commemorated the 20th anniversary of the 1994 genocide. Fergus was in Kigali over this period and attended genocide memorial ceremonies, massacre sites and interviewed a number of survivors. He reflects on Genocide Memorial Week and where Rwanda now finds itself in the modern world.

Anne cycled the northern coastline of Norway with her husband, fellow tandem cyclist David, and their 10 month old son. Hear about her journey; the white sandy beaches of the Vesterålen and Lofoten Islands, the beauty of mountains and fjords, and the pain of a 1,400km ride in the Arctic... with a cot, high chair and nappies!

Life in the plug: a journey through the forests of Panama - John Fuller

A journey to the Darién Province to visit ancient stone petroglyphs recorded by the explorer Robert Hyman in 1994. John recounts his stay in an Embera village, at the end of the Sambu River, expressing how he was fortunate enough to discover two new petroglyph sites whilst trekking in the surrounding forest.

Footsteps beyond the pond - Daniel Evans

From its pristine wilderness and bounty of flora and fauna, to its quaint settlements, Alaska is a source of hope. Daniel shares experiences of its unique and thriving landscape, and its revitalising weather. From the celestial dance of the Aurora Borealis, to cycling into a moose, Alaska will be forever lodged in Daniel's memory.

Sea turtles and hurricanes - Julia Ganis

The Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project has been studying the nesting habits of sea turtles for 28 years. Julia spent time with the project in the West Indies not only gaining hands-on experience with the critically endangered species – both nesting and hatching – but she also experienced the rapid development of Hurricane Gonzalo first hand.

Mahaweli Challenge: Sri Lanka's longest river on foot and by kayak - Ian Packham

Having never kayaked before, Ian set off to hike and paddle Sri Lanka’s longest river from source to sea. From the country’s third highest peak – Totapola Kanda – Ian travelled through tea plantations, ancient city-states, and modern tourist destinations. This journey challenged his ideas of river travel and demonstrated the difficulties of water security for developing nations.

In 2014, Canadian underwater archaeologists located the remains of HMS Erebus, Sir John Franklin’s vessel on his ill-fated 1845 expedition. Ryan Harris will present the discovery and investigation of this compelling shipwreck.

British swimmer Adam Walker is among a handful of people worldwide, and the only British person, to have completed all seven swims. He shares the trials and triumphs of this extraordinary endurance challenge.

Wracked by war, famine and Islamic extremism, Somalia has long been a byword for disaster. James, a veteran reporter on Afghanistan, went to find out why – and what is being done to fix it.

Asian expert John Keay investigates 1947’s partition of British India and explores its legacy of erratic leadership and hostile relationships between the five nations of South Asia.

Join a science journalist to explore the geology, geography and scenery of Icelandic volcanoes: from a world-changing 18th century eruption, to the latest ‘earth fires’ in 2014.

Tristram explores how the legacy of the British Empire remains in the lives and structures of the great cities which it shaped, and in cultures, economies and identities changed by interaction and adaptation.

Peter wrestled with modernity in Mongolia, seeing how old traditions survive in a modern world. The Grand Alpine Tour team travelled the length of the Alps, using new technologies to explore landscape change.

Historian and polar guide Huw explores the epic first crossing of Antarctica in 1958. Led by Vivian Fuchs and Ed Hillary, this great expedition finally fulfilled Shackleton’s dream.